Flora Day at Monet’

 

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Claude Monet lived in his home at Giverny for forty-three years. Within that time, he had meticulous ideas for his landscapers who gardened beautiful flowers outside the home and around a pond. You can immerse yourself in the world of the painter, famous for his landscape canvases and numerous views of his garden, such as the “Water Lilies,” the “Japanese Bridge” and “The Irises.”

Our timing was unpropitious as we arrived too early in the season to witness the water lilies blooming on the water. Nonetheless, the gardens were resplendent and the pond more lustrous than I imagined. One can easily spend a few hours sitting on one of the benches and staring off amongst the many species of flora. For those nature-enthused photographers keen on macro, landscapers seeking inspiration, art students dabbling with impressionism or an admirer of nature or history, this place is definatley worth the visit!

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Voyage de Fontainebleau

 Chateau Fomtainebleau

The Main Courtyard.

“The true home of Kings” and “The house of ages” in the words of Napoleon.

Facade of the chateau

Facade of the château.

 Chateau Fomtainebleau

Back side of the château.

View along Carpes Lake

View along Carp Lake.

The Chateau de Fontainebleau was inhabited more or less continuosly from the 12th century to the fall of Napoleon III in 1870. Today, its architecture, decor and opulent furnishings mean that visitors can still see how numerous French sovereigns have left their mark on the chateau. Inside there are works of art commissioned by many of the kings & queens along with their personal belongings and original furnishings in ornate designs.

The Chateau de Fontainebleau is one of very few royal residences in Europe to have been preserved in its entirety. The 11 euro entrance fee includes routes through; The Grands Apartments, The Renaissance and Throne rooms, Chapels and The Napoleon Museum.

Take a look at some of my favourite pictures from our tour this past weekend…

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The royal portrait gallery.

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Justin trying out his B&W photography in the “Plate Room.”

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Entrance leading to the Francais I Gallery.

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Audio guides costs 5 euros and were a great idea!

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Salon of Louis XIII

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It wouldn’t be a post without us!

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Inside the Empress Chamber.

One of the exterior doors.

One of the exterior doors.

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The canal behind you dates back from 1606 and the pathways covers approximately 321 acres. This unexplored area gives me the motivation for a return trip very soon!

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Walking through the “Jardin Anglais.”

Apparently this landscaped English-style garden wasn’t designed to Napoleon’s liking. Hmm, I wonder why? In this garden you’ll come across many different species of plants, rare trees, statues and an artificial river. Depending on your fondness for nature and your rhythmic stroll , expect to cover these areas in about an hour or so.

 Chateau Fomtainebleau Jeni Johnson

Jardin Anglais (English Garden)

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Exploring the grounds of Grand Parterre.

 Chateau Fomtainebleau Jeni Johnson

Overlooking Carp Lake and Cour Fontainebleau from the south.

 Chateau Fomtainebleau Jeni Johnson

West view.

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Thanks for dropping! ‘Till next time…Jeni