Let’s add some bones to the garden.

Mid last month we had some family visiting who requested we enjoy some garden tours. We’d visited the Monet House, Jardin du Luxembourg and on this particular day, the Jardin des Plantes. Of all the gardens we toured, we decided to top of the day by visiting some bones at the Paleontology Museum? Hence my title…”Let’s add some bones to the garden.”

IMG_5219Normally Paleontology doesn’t interest me but with Justin’s Uncle in tow who is astute and knowledgable in medical & science had me hooked, lined and educated. It turned out that I actually quite enjoyed this visit while mainly appreciating the venerable interior and vintage fixtures. One would see copious amounts of fossils, some oddities in jars of formaldehyde, century old typography and of course prehistoric to modern-day skeletal systems. IMG_5331

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Jardin des Plantes

For anyone planning a trip to Paris, this charming garden is worth visiting as it offers other areas that could peak your interests such as; the Grande Galerie de l’Evolution, the Mineralogy Museum, the Paleontology Museum and the Entomology Museum. In addition to the gardens there is also a small zoo, Menagerie du Jardin des Plantes. 

 

 

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Visit a French Poet at Place des Vosges

Meet Victor Hugo, sort of. One of the most celebrated authors of the 19th century and one of France most highly acclaimed poet, novelist and artist. He’s known by most for such works as Notre-Dame de Paris, (Hunchback of Notre-Dame) more notably; Les Misérables and Les Travailleurs de la Mer, just to name a few.

Touring the Red Drawing Room.

Touring the Red Drawing Room.

If your planning a trip to Paris, why not check out The Victor Hugo Museum (French; Maison de Victor Hugo ) who lived here for 16 years from 1832–1848. Even though it’s one of the cities lesser known museums, nicely tucked away on a corner of one of Paris’ beautifully arched passageways, it’s far less crowded and you can easily spend an hour rambling through the museums 7 rooms. I visited Hugo’s home this past Saturday for the first time..

 

For those on a budget, you’ll love the museums FREE entry, like I did! If you’d like an audio guide, the museum offers one in 6 different languages (French, English, German, Spanish, Italian and Japanese) for a nominal fee of 5€. Instead, I bought the Maison de Victor Hugo Museum Guide book for just 10€. The book provides detailed information about every room, displays colorful photography and devotes sections of writings and genealogy of Victor Hugo himself.  The book is definitely worth buying because you’ll find condensed information within the book and not having to research his life through different websites for information about to Victor Hugo.

The original architectural layout isn’t true to his past while living there, and that’s only because the building had been renovated to accommodate an academic setting. Many of Hugo’s furnishings and paintings from his former residences, before, during and after exile were donated to help bring back to life, his former apartment. You can read in detail about each room and see the evolving changes throughout the Maison de Victor Hugo Museum Guide or opt for the audio guide instead.

Wether you studied Victor Hugo, enjoyed his writings, seen any of his plays or made for cinema movies, then make Maison de Victor Hugo a sight-seeing to-do list while in Paris.

Maison de Victor Hugo
6 place des Vosges
75004 Paris
(33) 01 42 72 10 16

Map

Tuesday to Sunday from 10am to 6pm
Closed on Mondays and public holidays

 

Free Admission

Place Des Vosges Square, The museum is on the corner left ahead.

Place Des Vosges Square, The museum is on the corner left ahead.